Voter guide

Voter guide

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Where and when do you vote? Everything you need to know to vote in the 2020 election in Mississippi.

Who will be on the ballot on November 3? Meet the candidates who are running in the 2020 election.

This year, there are three initiatives that will be on the ballot: medical marijuana, the state flag design and a Jim Crow era provision.

The race to November 3 is on. Keep track of the countdown to election day.

GENERAL ELECTION: NOVEMBER 3, 2020

MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Mark your calendar for the General Election day, Tuesday, November 3. Make sure to set a notification so you’re reminded in advance. Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

ADD TO CALENDAR

REGISTER TO VOTE

Don’t know if you’re registered?  Search your name on the Secretary of State’s website and find out if you are registered.

Not registered? The deadline to register to vote in the general election is October 5, 2020 at 5:00 pm. Apply through the Secretary of State’s Office.

APPLY HERE

WHERE TO VOTE

Find your polling place by visiting the Mississippi Secretary of State’s Office and entering your address.

FIND YOUR POLLING PLACE

WHAT TO BRING

What do you need to bring to your polling place or to the Circuit Clerk’s office for absentee voting? Visit the Secretary of State’s list of acceptable forms of ID and find out if you need a Mississippi Voter Identification Card.

VIEW HERE

Cindy Hyde-Smith*

*Incumbent

Jimmy Edwards

U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Click the links in the drop-downs below to read coverage of each candidate.

Republican: Trent Kelly*

Democrat: Antonia Eliason

*incumbent

Republican: Brian Flowers

Democrat: Bennie Thompson*

*incumbent

Republican: Michael Guest*

Democrat: Dorothy “Dot” Benford

*incumbent

Republican: Steven M. Palazzo*

Democrat: N/A

*incumbent

MISSISSIPPI SUPREME COURT

Place 1:

  • Kenny Griffis*
  • Latrice Westbrooks

 

Place 2:

  • Leslie D. King (unopposed)

 

*incumbent

Place 3:

  • Michael Randolph (unopposed)

 

Place 3:

  • Josiah Dennis Coleman*
  • Percy L. Lynchard

*incumbent

PRESIDENT

President: Donald Trump*

Vice President: Mike Pence*

*Incumbent

President: Joe Biden

Vice President: Kamala Harris

  • President: Phil Collins
    • Vice President: Bill Parker
  • President: Brock Pierce
    • Vice President: Karla Ballard
  • President: Kanye West
    • Vice President: Michelle Tidball

President: Howie Hawkins

Vice President: Angela Nicole Walker

President: Jo Jorgensen

Vice President: Jeremy “Spike” Cohen

President: Brian Carroll

Vice President: Amar Patel

President: Don Blankenship

Vice President: William Mohr

Along with the races above, voters will also have their say in three different ballot measures: medical marijuana, a new state flag design and removing a Jim Crow-era provision from the state constitution.

MEDICAL MARIJUANA

Mississippians who support medical marijuana will have to decide between two proposals that will be on the November general election ballot.

Lawmakers approved a proposal in March to place on the November ballot an alternative to a citizen-sponsored initiative designed to legalize medical marijuana for people with “debilitating illnesses.”

Supporters of the medical marijuana initiative say the legislative alternative is designed to confuse the voters and result in the defeat of both.

Read all of our coverage of the medical marijuana ballot measure.

STATE FLAG

Lawmakers passed a bill in June that immediately removed the state flag, and Gov. Tate Reeves signed the bill into law. A nine-person commission has been appointed to develop a single new design by September, and Mississippi voters will approve or reject that design on the November 2020 ballot.

In the meantime, Mississippi will have no official state flag.

Read all of our coverage of the Mississippi state flag.

REMOVING THE HOUSE ELECTORAL PROVISION

Voters will have the opportunity in November to remove a Jim Crow-era provision from the state Constitution that makes Mississippi the only state in the nation where a candidate for statewide office can win a majority of the popular vote and not be elected.

The Mississippi Constitution, adopted in 1890, requires the winning candidate for governor and for other statewide offices to obtain both a majority of the popular vote and win the most votes in a majority of the 122 House districts.

Read all of our coverage of the electoral vote requirement ballot measure.

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