Several days of heavy rainfall fell over the Delta and parts of north and central Mississippi, breaching multiple levees, flooding homes and businesses, drowning crops and washing out roads.

Parts of Mississippi received up to seven inches of rain per day over a three-day period this week — a historic weather event.

“One observer measured slightly over 20 inches of rain in the last three days,” Andy Sniezak, National Weather Service meteorologist in Memphis, told the Clarion Ledger of rainfall in Tallahatchie County.

Several state and county highways in the Delta were closed this week because of flooding on Thursday. In Bolivar County, Emergency Management Agency Director Michael Lamb said that floodwaters got inside between 150-200 homes.

“We’ve had to use boats to rescue people and get them to safe ground,” Lamb said. “All the roads are under water, so we’ll have to wait until the water goes down before we can see if we have some infrastructure damage.”

The Mississippi Emergency Management Agency released video that showed two levees breached in Tallahatchie County, where more farmland was flooded.

Officials in Carroll County warned on Thursday evening that a dam known as the Pelucia Control Structure could collapse within the next 12 to 24 hours.

Earlier in the week, several in Lafayette County were asked to evacuate their homes on Wednesday due to a failing dam at Lake Tara. Those residents were later given the all-clear to return to their homes.

The weekend forecast calls for more rain and maybe severe weather in parts of the already affected areas of the state.

“After the week we’ve had this is not something anyone wants to see,” the Mississippi Emergency Management Agency (MSEMA) posted on Twitter.


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