Mississippi Civil Rights Museum

President Donald Trump will not speak publicly at the opening of the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum on Saturday.

He will tour the museum in the morning, then speak in the Two Museums Auditorium to civil rights veterans, museum patrons and elected officials, according to Gov. Phil Bryant’s office.

Trump’s visit to the museum, officially announced earlier this week, sparked protests and boycotts. Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., who was a Freedom Rider incarcerated in Mississippi in the 1960s, was scheduled to speak during Saturday’s opening ceremonies. On Thursday, he and Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Bolton, declined their invitations, calling Trump’s scheduled appearance an “insult.”

Former Gov. Ray Mabus also announced he would not attend the opening ceremonies.

Jackson Mayor Chokwe Antar Lumumba also will not attend. On Friday he issued a statement: “The opening of the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum represents a
beautiful celebration of struggle, an epic story of glory, horrible suffering, tragedy, sacrifice and courage. I believe the celebration of this history is a compelling tribute to the Civil Rights Movement, however, the greatest salute to civil rights is a continuing commitment in pursuit of its ideals. The legacy of these heroes will not allow me to share the stage with a president who continues to denigrate their work.”

Lumumba, Thompson, The Veterans of the Civil Rights Movement and Derrick Johnson, national president of the NAACP, will host a press conference at 9 a.m. Saturday at the Smith Robertson Museum in Jackson to recognize civil rights activists.

Trump backlash: Officials boycott Civil Rights Museum opening

Late Thursday, the governor’s office has released the order of events for the ceremonial opening of the Museum of Mississippi History and the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum on Saturday.

10:30 a.m. President Donald Trump tours Mississippi Civil Rights Museum

10:47 a.m. Former Mississippi Supreme Court Justice Reuben Anderson introduces Gov. Phil Bryant

10:48 a.m.  Gov. Bryant introduces President Trump

10:50 a.m.   President Trump delivers remarks inside the Two Museums Auditorium to Civil Rights veterans, museum patrons and elected officials

11:10 a.m.  Public celebration to mark Mississippi’s Bicentennial and to ceremonially open the two museums begins with procession to outside stage

11:15 a.m.  Chorale Prelude: Madison Central High School Brass Ensemble

11:18 a.m.  Welcome by Reuben Anderson, master of ceremonies

11:22 a.m.  Anderson introduces Gov. Bryant

11:23 a.m.  Gov. Phil Bryant speaks

11:30 a.m.  Anderson introduces former Gov. William Winter

11:32 a.m.  Gov. Winter speaks

11:36 a.m.  Anderson introduces civil rights activist Myrlie Evers

11:38 a.m.  Evers speaks

11:48 p.m.  Anderson introduces Katie Blount, director, Mississippi Department of Archives and History

11:50 p.m.  Blount speaks and introduces former Gov. Haley Barbour

11:52 p.m.  Gov. Barbour speaks

Noon  Blount introduces Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves and Speaker of the House Philip Gunn

12:03 p.m. Reeves speaks

12:06 p.m.  Gunn speaks

12:28 p.m.   Anderson introduces Kellogg Foundation President and CEO La June Tabron

12:30 p.m.  Tabron speaks

12:34 p.m.  Anderson introduces Rep. Gregg Harper and Sen. Roger Wicker

12:36 p.m.  Harper and Wicker present Bicentennial Resolution

12:45 p.m.  Anderson gives instructions on next phase of ribbon-cutting

12:46 p.m.  Musical performance by Bicentennial Choir with Cynthia Goodloe Palmer while stage participants and select audience members move to ribbon-cutting area

12:54 p.m.  Ribbon-cutting

12:58 p.m.  Gov. Bryant and Gov. Barbour hold two center doors open for Evers and students to enter museums.


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