Within the first 24 hours they were available, 3,500 tickets were reserved Wednesday to tour the new Museum of Mississippi History and Mississippi Civil Rights Museum in Jackson during opening weekend Dec. 9 and 10.

An additional 1,500 tickets were made available online Thursday morning, according to Stephenie Morrisey, assistant to the director for communication at the Mississippi Department of Archives and History. They aren’t expected to last long, either.

People who receive free timed tickets must show receipt of their registration in order to enter the museums. You will be admitted only at the time slot you registered. If you do not register during the opening weekend, general operation hours and ticket sales will begin Tuesday ,Dec. 12.

To reserve tickets for the opening weekend, visit www.twomuseumsopening.com.

The grand opening celebration will be free to attend and include music, speakers and food trucks.

The Museum of Mississippi History will touch on all aspects of life in Mississippi from 13,000 B.C. to the present day. The Mississippi Civil Rights Museum will focus on the struggle for equal rights from 1945 to 1976.


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Ashley F.G. Norwood

Ashley F. G. Norwood, a native of Jackson, earned a bachelor's degree in English from Jackson State University and a master’s degree from the Meek School of Journalism at the University of Mississippi. Norwood, who specializes in multimedia journalism, has been recognized nationally for her documentary film the fly in the buttermilk, which covers the history, perceptions and principles of black Greek-lettered organizations at the University of Mississippi.